Long Time, No See!

Sincerest apologies for the hiatus! I can say with great confidence that a lot has changed in my clay world and I'm excited to share with you all, once again, my journey.  It's hard to believe it's been more than a year since I've last posted, but it's been a very busy year for me--I'm much better at keeping my insta and facebook up to date.  But, I'll be better about sharing more content on the blog.  While images are worth 1,000 words, I'd like to actually get it down in writing! 

So here's the skinny: I've relocated now to a small shop in Carlisle, PA after completing my residency at the North Carolina Pottery Center.  In addition to having a brick and mortar storefront and studio location on one of the best streets (Pomfret Street),  I'm working as the Ceramics Studio Manager at the local arts center, Carlisle Arts Learning Center

I'm a busy little bee, but I wouldn't change it for the world! I have so many images and stories to share with you from my clay-ventures in North Carolina.  I intend to share those stories with you over the course of the next few blog updates.  And of course, I'll keep you apprised of all of the new and exciting things happening here, in PA.  If you find yourself in the area, pop in and say hello, don't be a stranger!

 K. Olson Ceramics: located at 34 W. Pomfret Street Carlisle, PA 17013

K. Olson Ceramics: located at 34 W. Pomfret Street Carlisle, PA 17013

Electric Soda Kiln

 Jared Zehmer's studio in Seagrove, NC.

Jared Zehmer's studio in Seagrove, NC.

So the name for this blog post is partially misleading.  The nature of this converted electric kiln, constructed and fired by Jared Zehmer, is fairly simple and straight forward.  With experimentation and a few tests, this transformed electric kiln yields some pretty amazing results!  Jared has converted several old electric kilns into gas fired reduction kilns.  One was of particular interest to me, his soda kiln.  Over the years, he's collected and experimented with various electric kiln "shells" (basically just the body of the kiln--no actual electrical components, elements and all removed) and played around with various kit burner systems, sizes, and placements to mimic reduction firing but on a smaller more manageable scale.  He's attempted this kind of firing with the introduction of soda once before and invited me and other soda enthusiasts;  STARworks resident artists Katie Maloney and Christina Bendo to join him in firing his "electric soda".  I've documented the process below.  I'm pleased with the results of the firing and I hope to fire this kind of kiln again.  I'm even considering making one for myself considering how quick of a turnover this firing process has! Thanks for the invitation to fire, Jarad!

Results from "electric soda" firing. February 2017. This gem glistened!

NC Pottery Center: Noborigama Firing #2

The last week was spent in preparation for my second firing of the Noborigama kiln at the North Carolina Pottery Center.  I considered myself fortunate to be firing with some of my ceramic idols this time around and the firing seemed to go off without a hitch! I look forward to opening the kiln in a few days. In the meantime, enjoy images of the firing process and stay tuned for the results!